Descalation of conflict needed over Solomon Chinese security deal

Dr Anouk Ride and Dr Tania Miletic from the Initiative for Peacebuilding at University of Melbourne examined ways out of escalating conflicts between the West, China and the Pacific over an intended security deal in two articles published today. An article in The Guardian looks at ways Australia, China and Solomon Islands can demilitarise and … Read more

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Australia’s security gifts to Solomon Islands are fragile

In an analysis for the Australian Institute of International Affairs’ publication, Australian Outlook, Dr Anouk Ride argues that a myriad of immediate security risks must be addressed if Australia’s gift of support for the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force is to not break in 2022 and/or 2023. Read more: https://www.internationalaffairs.org.au/australianoutlook/solomon-islands-security-blame-breakable-gifts-after-riots/

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Rapid analysis of Solomon Islands 2021 riots

As the looting and destruction of widescale riots in November 2021 drew to a close, Dr Anouk Ride provided an analysis of its causes, development and some initial reactions to the interpretation of the events for The Interpreter, a daily publication of the Lowy Institute. Read the analysis here: https://www.lowyinstitute.org/the-interpreter/honiara-smoke-subsides

Learn more...

Participatory research tool for fisheries communities in Pacific launched

An interactive tool to support women, youth, community leaders on how to review their local fisheries management practices and knowledge was presented today to the Cultivating Equality: Advancing Gender Research in Agriculture and Food Systems Conference, a gathering of researchers from across different Pacific countries and CGIAR (Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research) centres. Available on the … Read more

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Solomon Islands’ long summer of discontent – security challenges

Dr Anouk Ride was invited to be part of a special edition of Development Bulletin on security with an article “Solomon Islands Long Summer of Discontent: Security Challenges” available online today: https://lnkd.in/gu2-en4 The edition is produced by the Development Studies Network in close collaboration with, and support from, the Australia Pacific Security College, ANU. Thirty respected … Read more

Learn more...

Local markets matter for Pacific security

Markets are crucial to food security and social stability in the Pacific, however, mismanagement is threatening these vital community resources, Elizabeth Kopel, Meg Keen, and Anouk Ride write in an article pointing to research in Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands about factors that make markets so important for security. Read more: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/news-events/news/18377/why-local-markets-matter-pacific-security

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New Solomon action film launched

Hero-ine, a short action film, questions who are the heroes around us in cases of family violence? The Solomon-made production by Sukwadi Media was launched as part of the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Based Violence with local family violence service Family Support Centre on November 30. It has since become one of the … Read more

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New Solomon action film launched

Peace Meal – food’s role in peace

Peace-Meal : Stories and recipes from times of peace and conflict  (the book) brings you in to the lives of some of the most committed and inspiring peacebuilders who share a story and recipe that is significant to them from times of conflict and peace. Dr Anouk Ride shared a recipe and story about nut tart, … Read more

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Peace Meal – food’s role in peace

Renewed interest in community resilience

Authored by local researchers in five countries and edited by Prof. Diane Bretherton and Dr Anouk Ride, “Community resilience in Natural Disasters” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011) is gaining renewed interest in times of COVID19 where communities are dealing with an unprecedented health crisis and differential access of support from government and international actors. The book details … Read more

Learn more...

Herstory: Women working in corrections 1986-2018 (0)

Published on Mon, 1/07/19 | News, Publications, Research

Herstory: Women working in corrections” book  tells the stories of pioneering women working in prisons in Solomon Islands and how collectively they fought for women to be considered equal to men in the male-dominated security sector. Sukwadi Media worked with the CSSI Women’s Network over nine months on this participatory research and media project to bring the book and a film to fruition, with funding support from Australian Government.

The book HerStoryis the collective story of 24 women who worked in prisons and correctional services from 1986 to the present day. These women have a combined total of 377 years of service to CSSI. It is the first time Pacific correctional officers have published their own history of service.

Free download e-version is available: http://d1009381.my.ozhosting.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Herstory-Booklet-FINAL_BLEED2.pdf

Riots in Solomon Islands: the day after (0)

Published on Fri, 26/04/19 | News, Research

Riots broke out in Solomon Islands on 24 April following the parliament’s controversial election of Prime Minister Manasseh Sogavare. Despite the country peacefully holding its first elections since the end of the regional assistance mission earlier this month, frustration with the political system has been fomenting for some time and the riots were targeted with political meaning, as argued in a submission for the Australian Institute of International Affairs “Australian Outlook”: https://www.internationalaffairs.org.au/australianoutlook/riots-solomon-islands-day-after/

Infrastructure, conflict and the Pacific (0)

Published on Wed, 28/08/19 | News, Research

In a recent article for the Australian Institute of International Affairs, Dr Anouk Ride argues that donors need to be more cognizant of, and responsive to, local conflict risks in where and how infrastructure is delivered. Using the example of Solomon Islands, she tracks the impacts of previous infrastructure decisions on conflict and gender equality in the local context. Read more: http://www.internationalaffairs.org.au/australianoutlook/infrastructure-conflict-and-the-pacific-risks-and-realities/

After the Switch – the New China-Solomon Ties, Conflict and International Aid (0)

Published on Fri, 4/10/19 | News, Research

An analysis of the impact of the switch in bilateral relations from Taiwan to China is provided today in a new article by Dr Anouk Ride published in Australian Outlook, the online publication of the Australian Institute of International Affairs. An outline is given of implications of the switch for conflict, with some guidance about how donors can respond and encourage early intervention in conflicts which could arise in Solomon Islands in the next few years. Read the article online: http://www.internationalaffairs.org.au/australianoutlook/after-the-switch-the-new-china-solomon-ties-conflict-and-international-aid/

Economic participation of young women report launched (0)

Published on Thu, 17/10/19 | News, Research

A new report “Enhancing the Economic Participation of Vulnerable Youth Women in Solomon Islands” financed by the World Bank’s East Asia and Pacific Umbrella Facility for Gender Equality was launched today.

The study, including field research designed and overseen by Dr Anouk Ride, identifies constraints to, and effective measures for, increasing the economic participation of vulnerable young women in urban and peri-urban areas of Solomon Islands. The findings will inform both the SIG’s Community Access and Urban Services Enhancement (CAUSE) project, as well as development partners supporting gender, youth and disability livelihood activities in Solomon Islands.

Herstory film wins Best Feature Film at Native Lens Film Festival (0)

Published on Wed, 13/11/19 | Film in the Pacific, Films, News, Uncategorized

At the inaugural Native Lens Film Festival in Honiara, a team of local    and international judges awarded the film “Herstory: Women working in corrections” coproduced by the Correctional Services  Solomon Islands (CSSI) Women’s Network and Sukwadi Media the  award for Best Feature Film 2019. Herstory is a participatory  documentary film that tells the stories of pioneering women who were  the first to work in prisons in Solomon Islands. These women tell their  personal stories of achievement and how they collectively fought for  women’s rights in a once male-dominated workplace.

Dr Anouk Ride, co-producer initially accepted the award on behalf of the film-making team then, at a ceremony yesterday, this award was formerly handed over by co-producer Wendy Gebe to the CSSI Commissioner.

New report on family violence services launched today (0)

Published on Tue, 26/11/19 | News, Research

A new report “Women’s Experiences of Family Violence Services in Solomon Islands”  was launched today in Honiara as part of the celebrations for the 16 Days of Activism  Against Gender Based Violence. The Solomon Islands Government has taken a number  of measures including the gazetting of the Family Protection Act 2014 (FPA) in April  2016. Three years later, this research discovers women’s sense of safety and satisfaction  with family violence services including courts, counselling and refuges, health services  and the most often used service: police. The findings are based on qualitative analysis  of approximately 10% of all service users: a total of 126 interviews with service users  across five provinces, plus 24 interviews with service provider staff. The findings  triangulate violence survivors’ perspectives on service provision, situational factors and  personal agency in order to provide recommendations for the future of the FPA system.
CLICK HERE TO READ THE REPORT ONLINE

Women in security in Pacific Islands (0)

Published on Thu, 14/05/20 | News, Research

Women still lack adequate influence in setting security agendas, yet there is evidence that significant gains can occur when a more gender-sensitive and inclusive approach is taken, Anouk Ride and Meg Keen write in this analysis on Policy Forum: https://www.policyforum.net/too-few-boots-on-the-ground/

State of Emergency in Solomon Islands (0)

Published on Fri, 5/06/20 | News, Research

In a recent article in Policy Forum, Dr Anouk Ride and Gina Kekea outline how the State of Emergency in Solomon Islands is creating problems of governance and trust of civil society in the ability of government to uphold their citizen’s interests. The article also points to critical reviews of use of emergency powers by other Solomon academics and institutions. Read more here: https://www.policyforum.net/together-or-apart-against-covid-19-the-solomon-islands-state-of-emergency/

Food systems in a crisis – new report on rural communities in Pacific Islands (0)

Published on Thu, 6/08/20 | News, Research

Although as of June 1, 2020, Solomon Islands had no coronavirus cases, there was a national economic recession plus restrictions on people’s movement, gatherings, education and business activities. For rural areas, two of the biggest changes have been increased circulation of people—those who moved out of Honiara and back to the provinces—and reduced cash flow. A new report by WorldFish Solomon Islands details what this means for fish, local fisheries mangement and food security across a sample of rural communities in the country. Read the report here: https://www.worldfishcenter.org/content/changes-and-adaptations-village-food-systems-solomon-islands-rapid-appraisal-during-early and a summary of findings on Devpolicy https://devpolicy.org/coastal-fisheries-in-a-pandemic-solomon-island-and-vanuatu-experiences-20200729/

Renewed interest in community resilience (0)

Published on Thu, 6/08/20 | News, Research

Authored by local researchers in five countries and edited by Prof. Diane Bretherton and Dr Anouk Ride, “Community resilience in Natural Disasters” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011) is gaining renewed interest in times of COVID19 where communities are dealing with an unprecedented health crisis and differential access of support from government and international actors. The book details how aid and government interventions can help or hurt local community resilience in disasters (including chapters and cases from Kenya, Indonesia, Pakistan, Solomon Islands ,Myanmar, Mexico and Australia) and is currently available directly from the publisher https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9780230114289 and from major retailers including Target USA https://www.target.com/p/community-resilience-in-natural-disasters-by-anouk-ride-diane-bretherton-hardcover/-/A-80966315

New Solomon action film launched (0)

Published on Wed, 16/12/20 | News, Uncategorized

Hero-ine, a short action film, questions who are the heroes around us in cases of family violence? The Solomon-made production by Sukwadi Media was launched as part of the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Based Violence with local family violence service Family Support Centre on November 30. It has since become one of the most-watched Solomon films of 2019 and been screened at the Native Lens Film Festival, along with other Pacific films produced under the film4gender project of the Pacific Community Filmmaking Consortium. Watch the film here: Hero-ine_Short Action Film – YouTube

Solomon Islands’ long summer of discontent – security challenges (0)

Published on Fri, 12/03/21 | News, Research, Uncategorized

Dr Anouk Ride was invited to be part of a special edition of Development Bulletin on security with an article “Solomon Islands Long Summer of Discontent: Security Challenges” available online today: https://lnkd.in/gu2-en4 The edition is produced by the Development Studies Network in close collaboration with, and support from, the Australia Pacific Security College, ANU. Thirty respected Pacific Island and international academics, development and security professionals provide a wide-ranging exploration of the unique and urgent security needs of Pacific Island nations in the special edition, which is open access and available to all to read.

Rapid analysis of Solomon Islands 2021 riots (0)

Published on Wed, 12/01/22 | News, Research

As the looting and destruction of widescale riots in November 2021 drew to a close, Dr Anouk Ride provided an analysis of its causes, development and some initial reactions to the interpretation of the events for The Interpreter, a daily publication of the Lowy Institute. Read the analysis here: https://www.lowyinstitute.org/the-interpreter/honiara-smoke-subsides

Australia’s security gifts to Solomon Islands are fragile (0)

Published on Wed, 12/01/22 | News, Research

In an analysis for the Australian Institute of International Affairs’ publication, Australian Outlook, Dr Anouk Ride argues that a myriad of immediate security risks must be addressed if Australia’s gift of support for the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force is to not break in 2022 and/or 2023. Read more: https://www.internationalaffairs.org.au/australianoutlook/solomon-islands-security-blame-breakable-gifts-after-riots/

Participatory research tool for fisheries communities in Pacific launched (0)

Published on Thu, 14/10/21 | News, Publications, Research

An interactive tool to support women, youth, community leaders on how to review their local fisheries management practices and knowledge was presented today to the Cultivating Equality: Advancing Gender Research in Agriculture and Food Systems Conference, a gathering of researchers from across different Pacific countries and CGIAR (Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research) centres.

Available on the Pacific Community (SPC) website, this Community-based Fisheries Management Plan Reviews – Facilitation Guide, co-published by SPC, WorldFish and the University of Wollongong, sets out a participatory process for women, men, and youth to have a say in what the rules are for fishing in their coastal area, who makes the rules and how they are enforced.

The guide offers tips to support facilitators in conducting effective participatory reviews of community-based fisheries management (CBFM), including through the active engagement of people of diverse backgrounds, ages, and genders. It is accompanied by a set of data collection sheets to record involvement of women, youth, and men in decision making.

“Community-based fisheries management is vital for food security and livelihoods in the Pacific. It allows each community to manage their fishing, harvesting and other effects of human use of their coast and marine areas. We need processes like this review to ensure that no one is excluded from decisions about their fish and aquatic foods, and as we know inclusive decisions are more likely to be upheld over time. The guide is designed to be used by community facilitators, with activities to capture indigenous knowledge and management aspirations, using oral storytelling and visual tools that can allow everyone to participate,” said Dr. Anouk Ride, Representative of WorldFish.

Community-based Fisheries Management  is a key priority for coastal fisheries in the Pacific premised on the understanding that each community is responsible for its respective marine environment. It enables communities to assume this lead role in managing fisheries and adjacent coastal areas and resources. The guide uses a diagram of a fish that symbolizes the CBFM plan where participants write down their suggestions and decisions.

“In its first trials of the tool in Kiribati, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, the tool was found to increase the role of women and youth in decisions about coastal fisheries management and in representation on decision-making committees,” said Céline Muron, SPC Information and Outreach officer.

The preparation of this guide was funded by the Australian Government through the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) and produced with support from the European Union and Government of Sweden through the Pacific-European Union Marine Partnership (PEUMP) Programme.

Useful link:
Community-based Fisheries Management Plan Reviews : https://bit.ly/3DxN23K

Local markets matter for Pacific security (0)

Published on Wed, 13/01/21 | News, Research

Markets are crucial to food security and social stability in the Pacific, however, mismanagement is threatening these vital community resources, Elizabeth Kopel, Meg Keen, and Anouk Ride write in an article pointing to research in Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands about factors that make markets so important for security. Read more: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/news-events/news/18377/why-local-markets-matter-pacific-security

Descalation of conflict needed over Solomon Chinese security deal (0)

Published on Tue, 5/04/22 | News, Research

Dr Anouk Ride and Dr Tania Miletic from the Initiative for Peacebuilding at University of Melbourne examined ways out of escalating conflicts between the West, China and the Pacific over an intended security deal in two articles published today. An article in The Guardian looks at ways Australia, China and Solomon Islands can demilitarise and descalate tensions locally and regionally, read more here: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/apr/05/tensions-are-high-between-china-and-australia-over-solomon-islands-but-its-in-everyones-interests-to-simmer-down while another article in Pursuit looks specifically on what Australia can do to better balance its support to countries in the Pacific to prevent conflict https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/stepping-carefully-amid-conflict-in-the-pacific

Development communications: how to burp well (0)

Published on Thu, 14/10/21 | Blogs

Communications products are seen as the burps of the development sector – after the project recipe is finalised, some activities are underway, an agreed set of communications products will be defined and burped out, a result of the “main meal” which is the project activities. As burps, there is often less foresight and planning, and the idea amongst the project designers that “anyone” can do it: project staff often having communications added to the list of their other tasks.

I’ve been working in this field in different capacities for around twenty years, as a journalist on the receiving end of these burps, as a communications officer making materials as required by my employer, and as a researcher trying to evaluate the effects of communications on individuals or groups of people’s knowledge, behaviour change, or particular attitudes. The following is my distillation of what I have learnt being surrounded by the many communication burps of the development sector.

The easiest mistake to make doing communications in development sector is to not understand your audience: what their knowledge level is, what they care about, what information sources they trust and what kinds of information they want and need. Some good examples of investing in understanding your audience in Solomon Islands, where I live, include Information in Natural Disasters, a report in which communications materials were tested with disaster affected communities to find out useful information like people did not want to be talked down to, disliked cartoons as a form of communication about serious issues and thought hiding under the table during an earthquake was terrible advice.

What NGO workers assume people know, think and how they communicate can be different from reality, and, in a culturally diverse population like Solomon Islands, it is imperative to check how messages are received. For instance, I was involved in Solomon Islands’ first social marketing study into attitudes and communication on violence against women and girls. We talked to 200 people across different cultures and situations and found that local people had many messages that they thought worked to stop or prevent violence – 324 messages but almost all of them different from those used by iNGOs. We need more organisations to tap into local messages that work, rather than trying to design slogans from head office. Messages identified from that piece of research that were seen as most effective in preventing or stopping violence are now being spread through mass communications to address high rates of family violence.

The second easiest mistake is to forget about the audience and please your boss. If you work for an organisation in which your managers believe you have to explain in each communication the organisation, the project aims, the Sustainable Development Goals and whatever higher-level policy led to the project, you will have little room to actually communicate your message.

The third most common mistake is not to test communications products using research. As a result, what the donor and development management professionals think is great, is often what is least effective and appropriate. For example, individual “success” stories or “faces” of particular issues that “personalise the issue”. Often international NGOs believe that an individual woman talking will inspire women in the audience to achieve, advocate or act on an issue. However, my own internal testing indicates Solomon women will often focus in on following features of the person profiled: their education (particularly if they were schooled overseas, or at a private school), influential people the woman is related to (usually politicians or former politicians) and their ethnicity or tribe’s status. That woman is judged relationally before her message is heard, and often status and relationality can overtake message in what is retained by the audience. Younger women will talk about how young women who speak publicly take the risk of any small “mistake”, like wearing certain clothes or posting something frivolous on Facebook, is amplified and used to shame and humiliate them. “Inspiration” stories can work, but they need to be pitched right and tested properly, to avoid negative flak for the people profiled, who may be unprepared to be the “face” of climate change, or gender equality or whatever topic in the story.

The final mistake in development communications is to be so creative that you are creating another world rather than designing communications for the real world. This often happens when expatriate communications staff are riding the “innovation” and “technology” wave, to get funding for new communication outputs. For instance, some of the more ridiculous pitches I have heard in development meetings the last ten years include “street art” in Pacific villages (until it was pointed out most people live in houses made out of timber and dried leaf panels, with few fences, so there were no public walls to adorn with spray paint). Another idea was to build a computer generated “person” or “bot” that women violence survivors could call for advice (when many women in violent relationships do not have their own personal phones and also have apprehension about using services that needs breaking down through human interaction).

Communications in the development sector will probably always be relegated to the burps, but a good burp (or series of ones) can be deeply satisfying. Communications that release local messages, in the most appropriate format, using pre-existing modes of communication and information sharing can be useful for knowledge and social change.

Dr Anouk Ride is a researcher on aid, development, conflict and social inclusion, and is based in Solomon Islands. She is an Affiliate Researcher with Australian National University and a Social Scientist with WorldFish.

Originally published on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/development-communications-how-burp-well-dr-anouk-ride/

Herstory: Women working in corrections 1986-2018 (0)

Published on Mon, 1/07/19 | News, Publications, Research
Herstory: Women working in corrections 1986-2018

“Herstory: Women working in corrections” book  tells the stories of pioneering women working in prisons in Solomon Islands and how collectively they fought for women to be considered equal to men in the male-dominated security sector. Sukwadi Media worked with the CSSI Women’s Network over nine months on this participatory research and media project to … Read more


Riots in Solomon Islands: the day after (0)

Published on Fri, 26/04/19 | News, Research

Riots broke out in Solomon Islands on 24 April following the parliament’s controversial election of Prime Minister Manasseh Sogavare. Despite the country peacefully holding its first elections since the end of the regional assistance mission earlier this month, frustration with the political system has been fomenting for some time and the riots were targeted with … Read more


Infrastructure, conflict and the Pacific (0)

Published on Wed, 28/08/19 | News, Research

In a recent article for the Australian Institute of International Affairs, Dr Anouk Ride argues that donors need to be more cognizant of, and responsive to, local conflict risks in where and how infrastructure is delivered. Using the example of Solomon Islands, she tracks the impacts of previous infrastructure decisions on conflict and gender equality … Read more


After the Switch – the New China-Solomon Ties, Conflict and International Aid (0)

Published on Fri, 4/10/19 | News, Research

An analysis of the impact of the switch in bilateral relations from Taiwan to China is provided today in a new article by Dr Anouk Ride published in Australian Outlook, the online publication of the Australian Institute of International Affairs. An outline is given of implications of the switch for conflict, with some guidance about … Read more


Economic participation of young women report launched (0)

Published on Thu, 17/10/19 | News, Research
Economic participation of young women report launched

A new report “Enhancing the Economic Participation of Vulnerable Youth Women in Solomon Islands” financed by the World Bank’s East Asia and Pacific Umbrella Facility for Gender Equality was launched today. The study, including field research designed and overseen by Dr Anouk Ride, identifies constraints to, and effective measures for, increasing the economic participation of … Read more


Herstory film wins Best Feature Film at Native Lens Film Festival (0)

Published on Wed, 13/11/19 | Film in the Pacific, Films, News, Uncategorized
Herstory film wins Best Feature Film at Native Lens Film Festival

At the inaugural Native Lens Film Festival in Honiara, a team of local    and international judges awarded the film “Herstory: Women working in corrections” coproduced by the Correctional Services  Solomon Islands (CSSI) Women’s Network and Sukwadi Media the  award for Best Feature Film 2019. Herstory is a participatory  documentary film that tells the stories … Read more


New report on family violence services launched today (0)

Published on Tue, 26/11/19 | News, Research
New report on family violence services launched today

A new report “Women’s Experiences of Family Violence Services in Solomon Islands”  was launched today in Honiara as part of the celebrations for the 16 Days of Activism  Against Gender Based Violence. The Solomon Islands Government has taken a number  of measures including the gazetting of the Family Protection Act 2014 (FPA) in April  2016. … Read more


Women in security in Pacific Islands (0)

Published on Thu, 14/05/20 | News, Research

Women still lack adequate influence in setting security agendas, yet there is evidence that significant gains can occur when a more gender-sensitive and inclusive approach is taken, Anouk Ride and Meg Keen write in this analysis on Policy Forum: https://www.policyforum.net/too-few-boots-on-the-ground/


State of Emergency in Solomon Islands (0)

Published on Fri, 5/06/20 | News, Research

In a recent article in Policy Forum, Dr Anouk Ride and Gina Kekea outline how the State of Emergency in Solomon Islands is creating problems of governance and trust of civil society in the ability of government to uphold their citizen’s interests. The article also points to critical reviews of use of emergency powers by … Read more


Food systems in a crisis – new report on rural communities in Pacific Islands (0)

Published on Thu, 6/08/20 | News, Research

Although as of June 1, 2020, Solomon Islands had no coronavirus cases, there was a national economic recession plus restrictions on people’s movement, gatherings, education and business activities. For rural areas, two of the biggest changes have been increased circulation of people—those who moved out of Honiara and back to the provinces—and reduced cash flow. … Read more


Renewed interest in community resilience (0)

Published on Thu, 6/08/20 | News, Research

Authored by local researchers in five countries and edited by Prof. Diane Bretherton and Dr Anouk Ride, “Community resilience in Natural Disasters” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011) is gaining renewed interest in times of COVID19 where communities are dealing with an unprecedented health crisis and differential access of support from government and international actors. The book details … Read more


New Solomon action film launched (0)

Published on Wed, 16/12/20 | News, Uncategorized
New Solomon action film launched

Hero-ine, a short action film, questions who are the heroes around us in cases of family violence? The Solomon-made production by Sukwadi Media was launched as part of the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Based Violence with local family violence service Family Support Centre on November 30. It has since become one of the … Read more


Solomon Islands’ long summer of discontent – security challenges (0)

Published on Fri, 12/03/21 | News, Research, Uncategorized

Dr Anouk Ride was invited to be part of a special edition of Development Bulletin on security with an article “Solomon Islands Long Summer of Discontent: Security Challenges” available online today: https://lnkd.in/gu2-en4 The edition is produced by the Development Studies Network in close collaboration with, and support from, the Australia Pacific Security College, ANU. Thirty respected … Read more


Rapid analysis of Solomon Islands 2021 riots (0)

Published on Wed, 12/01/22 | News, Research

As the looting and destruction of widescale riots in November 2021 drew to a close, Dr Anouk Ride provided an analysis of its causes, development and some initial reactions to the interpretation of the events for The Interpreter, a daily publication of the Lowy Institute. Read the analysis here: https://www.lowyinstitute.org/the-interpreter/honiara-smoke-subsides


Australia’s security gifts to Solomon Islands are fragile (0)

Published on Wed, 12/01/22 | News, Research

In an analysis for the Australian Institute of International Affairs’ publication, Australian Outlook, Dr Anouk Ride argues that a myriad of immediate security risks must be addressed if Australia’s gift of support for the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force is to not break in 2022 and/or 2023. Read more: https://www.internationalaffairs.org.au/australianoutlook/solomon-islands-security-blame-breakable-gifts-after-riots/


Participatory research tool for fisheries communities in Pacific launched (0)

Published on Thu, 14/10/21 | News, Publications, Research

An interactive tool to support women, youth, community leaders on how to review their local fisheries management practices and knowledge was presented today to the Cultivating Equality: Advancing Gender Research in Agriculture and Food Systems Conference, a gathering of researchers from across different Pacific countries and CGIAR (Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research) centres. Available on the … Read more


Local markets matter for Pacific security (0)

Published on Wed, 13/01/21 | News, Research

Markets are crucial to food security and social stability in the Pacific, however, mismanagement is threatening these vital community resources, Elizabeth Kopel, Meg Keen, and Anouk Ride write in an article pointing to research in Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands about factors that make markets so important for security. Read more: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/news-events/news/18377/why-local-markets-matter-pacific-security


Descalation of conflict needed over Solomon Chinese security deal (0)

Published on Tue, 5/04/22 | News, Research

Dr Anouk Ride and Dr Tania Miletic from the Initiative for Peacebuilding at University of Melbourne examined ways out of escalating conflicts between the West, China and the Pacific over an intended security deal in two articles published today. An article in The Guardian looks at ways Australia, China and Solomon Islands can demilitarise and … Read more


Why LinkedIn is better for girls and women than Facebook (0)

Published on Mon, 22/10/18 | Blogs

Recently I have been spending less time on Facebook and more time on LinkedIn and my outlook on life is better for it. The shift started earlier this year, there were two events in my social circle that made me realise Facebook is destructive, particularly for women’s self-esteem, solidarity and respect. The first one was … Read more


Tanna reveals more about the industry than the island (0)

Published on Mon, 30/01/17 | Film in the Pacific

The acclaim for Tanna, a film shot on the Vanuatuan island of the same name, continues into 2017, with its recent nomination for Best Foreign Language Film at the Oscars. Cinematically beautiful, shot with a relatively small crew from Australia, the film tells a story of a young woman whose marriage is arranged while she … Read more


Disney dramas in the Pacific (0)

Published on Thu, 10/11/16 | Film in the Pacific

One of the first people to see the upcoming Disney movie Moana will probably be me.   Featuring a Pacific female lead, Moana, tells the story of a sea voyage by a young girl in search of a fabled island. I am one of those uncool people that watches animated feature films regularly and without shame. … Read more


Student deals to buy “Community Resilience in Natural Disasters” on Amazon.com (0)

Published on Thu, 6/09/12 | Uncategorized
Student deals to buy “Community Resilience in Natural Disasters” on Amazon.com

Check out new student and researcher deals to buy “Community Resilience in Natural Disasters” by Dr Diane Bretherton and Anouk Ride here: http://www.amazon.com/Community-Resilience-Natural-Disasters-Bretherton/dp/0230114288


Pacific journalists increase investigative reporting on tuna (0)

Published on Sat, 25/08/12 | Uncategorized
Pacific journalists increase investigative reporting on tuna

Pacific journalists are producing more stories and more in-depth stories on tuna thanks to a PEW/PNA “Communicating Tuna” workshop coordinated by Anouk Ride. 10 journalists, nominated by their managers, came to Honiara and Noro in Solomon Islands as part of the week-long workshop to be briefed on topical tuna management and development issues. Stories so … Read more


University of Queensland – Working with Local Strengths, Solomon Islands (Comments Off)

Published on Thu, 23/06/11 | Uncategorized

A paper by Morgan Brigg, Volke Boege and Anouk Ride was completed entitled ”Working with Local Strengths: Supporting States and Interveners to institutionalise the Responsibility to Protect, Solomon Islands Framework of Engagement”.  The report looks specifically at how local strengths (chiefs, church leaders, women and youth representatives who deal with local peace and order issues) can link up … Read more


Promotional project materials – Oceanic Fisheries Management Project (0)

Published on Sat, 22/01/11 | Publications
Promotional project materials – Oceanic Fisheries Management Project

Most recently, I produced a series of factsheets, folders, brochure and a short film were made for the Oceanic Fisheries Management Project, a UNDP-GEF funded project coordinated by the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency and Secretariat of the Pacific Community and also involving conservation organisations WWF and IUCN (see http://www.ffa.int/gef for project details and downloads). … Read more


The Grand Experiment (11)

Published on Fri, 21/01/11 | Books
The Grand Experiment

Two boys travel three continents to follow one monk’s dream, in this untold story from Australia’s colonial history. In 1848, the Spanish missionary Rosendo Salvado, founder of New Norcia Monastery in Western Australia, had an idea. He would prove that Aboriginal people could be educated and ‘civilised’, by taking two Nyungar boys to be schooled … Read more


International Peace Research Association Conference – Communicating Peace (0)

Published on Sat, 10/07/10 | Research

The paper “Community perception of effects of disaster aid on conflict and peace in the Solomon Islands” was presented to the IPRA 2010 Conference, Sydney, Australia,which included a fascinating mix of scholars from all over the world as detailed in the Conference Programme. Contact Anouk Ride for a copy of the paper.